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Excuses, Excuses

Every day God gives us opportunities to share His love with people around us. But how often do we walk right past these open doors? If you are anything like me, then you have a million reasons for missing these opportunities that you wrap up in pretty little packages with bows on top.

But in the end, these fancy explanations are just excuses. We have to recognize them for what they are and learn to overcome them.

Here are some common excuses I recognize in my life:

Pride

What will people think about me if I share the gospel with them? Will it be awkward? What if they reject me?

Well, it turns out these are all the wrong questions. My natural tendency is to focus on how I am affected by an interaction rather than thinking about how God can be glorified through it. In these situations, I am continually reminded to shift my focus to God.

Showing Love by Sharing the Gospel

Raising a 2-year-old toddler has raised quite a lot of parenting discussions in our home.

Two-year-olds need a lot of guidance for life. They need a lot of patience from their parents. And they need a lot of love and comfort to know they are secure.

We will teach our girl many things as she grows in our home over the next 16 years until we send her out.

But what if I failed to tell her that we love her? What if I skipped over teaching her a basic concept like brushing her teeth? What would happen if I never shared with her how to eat properly and healthily, how to be kind to others, or how to take care of herself?

Many would question my love for her. Raising children means loving them. Loving them means teaching them fully how to live.

Sharing the gospel with others is not much different.

Boldness to proclaim truth in the midst of persecution

Amazon rainbow

Decimation, hopelessness, and abuse. Three words that describe the indigenous in the Colombian Amazon,” shares Bronson Parker.* Diego, a 60-year-old Cocama man, grew up seeing the aftereffects of the rubber boom industry in which thousands of indigenous were enslaved. Diego “is a fisherman, a carpenter, and an artist. Now, he is a Christ follower and His messenger,” says Bronson. Discipling is what Bronson Parker enjoys most about his ministry in the Amazon.

Bronson, Anna,* their three daughters and son share the gospel through storytelling. “The people are without hope, and are living in the consequences of their sinful lives,” shares Bronson. His family and missionary friends strive to encourage one another in the work being done.

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