Week of Prayer for International Missions

Prepare Your Heart

This past Sunday marked the beginning of the Advent season, a time of preparation for the birth of Christ. I spent the weekend decorating my house, both inside and outside. At church, we adorned the sanctuary with wreaths, garlands, holly and ivy, poinsettias and Chrismons during the traditional Hanging of the Green service. It's even beginning to look a lot like Christmas here at the national WMU building!

Yet, just as we decorate our homes, churches and offices for this special season of the year, we should also prepare our hearts for the coming of the Christ child into the world. A meaningful way to do this is by participating in the Week of Prayer for International Missions from December 3–10.

Throughout the week, pray for missionaries around the world as they share the good news of Jesus with all the nations. Visit this page on the International Mission Board's website for more details about the missionaries, as well as specific prayer requests for each day:

Missionary Spotlight Update: Jared and Tara Jones

Jared and Tara Jones knew that God could do a lot with something little. But they never imagined just how many doors He would open through their young son, whose adoption people had told them was almost impossible in Japan. In the East Asian country, 40,000 children live in orphanages, but parents rarely give up their rights so that a child can be adopted.

But the Joneses knew God had placed a baby on their hearts, so they prayed, and not too long after, they both got the impression that they were praying for a particular expectant mother. Soon after, God opened the doors and gave them favor with Japanese social workers, Tara Jones said.

“The birth mother had asked to meet us, and it was the most emotional day,” she said.

The Joneses thanked the young mother for her courage, for her choice to give him life. They prayed God’s presence would be so strong in the room that the mother would remember that day and God would fill her with peace all over again.

“We wept, and so did the social worker,” Tara Jones said. And the Joneses walked out of the hospital and onto the train with Ezra in their arms.

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