Children's Project Ideas

Your CMD 2018 Stories (Part 4)

We have more stories for you! Let's hear what children from across the country did for this year's Children's Missions Day to serve their communities.

“We collected money through Change Makes Sense program (offering for the Children in Action and Mission Friends programs) at our church on January 28 to fund our project. We purchased supplies for the project with this money. On February 14, all 17 children put together appreciation baskets for 8 local first responder agencies. On February 17, 9 of the children delivered the baskets to the 8 agencies and thanked them for their service to our community and encouraged them through prayers, love and support.” (For a glimpse of their baskets, see the photo to the right!)

— Jenna Bocock, for the Children in Action at First Baptist Church Ridgeway in Ridgeway, Virginia

The Impact of Children's Missions Day

Children’s Missions Day gives you everything you need to know in the title: children do missions in their communities on or around a day in February. When all of this comes together, you have the best recipe for a large, collective group of children sharing God’s love all across the country. Such a day is heartwarming, inspiring and all for the glory of God. This year, we’ve enjoyed reading and sharing the stories of kids living out the CMD 2018 “Go Serve” theme.

Your CMD 2018 Stories (Part 3)

We have more stories for you! Let's hear what children from across the country did for this year's Children's Missions Day to serve their communities. 

"Our GA group baked cookies and brownies for our local police officers and firefighters. They also wrote cards to thank them for their service to our community. We greatly enjoyed delivering these treats to our local heroes, who visited with our girls and gave them tours of the police and fire stations.” (Check out the photo collage to the right for a glimpse of their awesome day!)

— Becky Vick, for the GAs at Midway Baptist Church in Meridian, Mississippi

Your CMD 2018 Stories (Part 2)

We have more stories for you! Let's hear what children from across the country did for this year's Children's Missions Day to serve their communities. 

Your CMD 2018 Stories

Children's Missions Day 2018 was a big success as children learned to "Go Serve" their communities. Let's see how children's missions groups served their neighbors this year!

CMD 2018: Go Serve

Children's Missions Day (CMD) 2018 is coming soon! In fact, this annual February event will celebrate its 11th year this Saturday, February 17. It's not too late to join other children's missions groups nationwide in a great day of service to share God's love with people right in your own community. So, lace up your sneakers and get ready to hit the road and go serve!

Appropriately, the theme for this year's event is Go Serve. As you prepare your group for this special day, help children identify people in your area who are hurting — whether it's physically, spiritually or emotionally. Remember that a successful CMD project gives children the opportunity to tell someone what they know to be true about God while also meeting a physical need or offering words of encouragement. Ask children, What would you do for these people to share the love of Jesus with them?

Beat the Wintertime Blues: Plan a Cool Missions Event

Here in the Deep South, we have been experiencing some unusually frigid days this past week. For this Goldilocks-type girl—you know, not too hot, not too cold—the sub-freezing temperatures make me want to stay indoors, all bundled up in my sweats and furry socks in front of a warm, crackling fire. It's even been too cold for my "It's-not-cold-I-wear-shorts-all-year-long" 12-year-old son. Needless to say, he has a bad case of cabin fever and can't wait to get outside to ride that new bike he got for Christmas.

Last Minute Lottie (Moon Christmas Offering) Ideas

Christmas is over, but the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering (LMCO) season is not! And, guess what? It's not too late for your GAs, RAs or CAs to help take up the offering through a fun project. Consider any of these projects as ways to continue a focus on this special offering and help your kids learn that it's always the right time to support missionaries.

Tips for Keeping Older Kids Engaged in Missions Education

As you have probably noticed, kids have short attention spans. Often, a large dose of creativity is required to keep their attention for even a few minutes at a time.

A practical way to keep older kids engaged in missions education is by varying presentation methods. This takes time and preparation. As the missions leader, you must plan ahead to provide an assortment of informational items.

You can use the Internet to show videos about the focus country or people group. This is a great way to find a wealth of information, but be sure to preview any search results beforehand to avoid inappropriate material. Some older kids may be interested in becoming pen pals with a group of children or MKs in another country. As the leader, you can use social media to facilitate these interactions!

Don’t be afraid of trying foods from the area you are focusing on. Recipes are readily available and sometimes include suggestions for substitutions if something unusual is not accessible at your local grocery store. Kids will be delighted to try different dishes, especially if you eat it first!

Missionaries, Cookies, Kids, and Stickers

A few weeks ago, we learned about a missionary who bakes cookies and shares them with neighbors in an effort to eventually share the gospel with this new friend. Making cookies to become someone’s friend and eventually tell him or her about Jesus seemed like a very long process to my GAs.

“Why not just tell them that Jesus loves them?” one of my first-grade GAs asked.

This conversation led to a discussion about what it means to be a friend, why we do nice things for people, and how being nice to someone may make him or her want to be our friend.

We waded through a ton of comments and questions.

“I don’t have to give people cookies to be friends with them.”

“Does the missionary keep any of the cookies for herself?”

“Does she get to pick who she gives the cookies to?”

By the end of the discussion, I realized that my first-grade GAs were not going to fully understand this concept until they tried it for themselves.

Because I didn’t have cookies or the time to make them, I did the next best thing.


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