Children's Leaders

How to Lead a Child to Christ

Leading a child to Christ is one of the most exciting things you will ever do. It can also be intimidating. Remember that, while God has called you to share this message, it’s the work of the Holy Spirit that leads a child to give his or her life to Christ.

Don’t give into your fears. Pray first. Then, invite the Holy Spirit to work with you as you share.

1. Be Conversational

When counseling one-on-one with a child, be conversational. Ask open-ended questions, then listen closely to the child’s reply. Questions to ask a child might include:
• Who is Jesus?
• What is sin?
• What is a Christian?
• Why do you want to become a Christian?
• How do you feel? (Sometimes the feelings we have are God’s way of speaking to us.)
• What has led you to start thinking about becoming a Christian?
• How long have you wanted to be a Christian?

2. Use the Bible

During the conversation, show the child verses in the Bible. Slowly explain the following verse to the child.

That's a Wrap: WMU Celebrates CMD

“We didn’t have anything like this when I was little,” said Ana Cornel about Children’s Missions Day, which was hosted this year at national WMU in Birmingham on Feb. 17, as well as in churches across the country. “This is such a blessing for these children.”

Cornel, a Girls in Action (GA) leader at Iglesia Bautista Cristo Nuestra Esperanza (Christ Our Hope Baptist Church), explained she was born “automatically Catholic” in Mexico, as was Eulalia Ramones who also participated in Children’s Missions Day alongside her 7-year-old daughter, Ana Gutierrez.

“I was raised Catholic,” said Ramones, “then a friend invited me to church and I heard the gospel. I want my daughters learning at a young age about God and missions.”

Cornel said she leads GA because she has a missions heart. “I love missions and I want them [GA members] to learn they can be missionaries as little girls and that God has a purpose for their lives. My prayer is that one or more of these girls will grow up to be a missionary.”

Week of Prayer for North American Missions 2018

The Week of Prayer for North American Missions is nearly upon us! Starting on Sunday, March 4, 2018, Southern Baptists from all over will be specifically praying for various missionary efforts and the folks who oversee them here at home. From church planting to disaster relief and everything in-between, North American missionaries are continually on the lookout for ways to fulfill the Great Commission.

It may be difficult for some of us to think that missionary work needs to be done here at home. But as current trends of church decline and globalization of United States cities persist, missionary efforts here at home have perhaps never been needed more than they are now. In years past, to carry the message of Jesus Christ to different cultures and languages meant traveling the vast seas to parts unknown. Today, it means walking down the street to your neighbor's house! The world has come to our cities and states, and it's our job as believers to offer them a hand of friendship and the way of everlasting life through the life and love of Jesus.

Going for the Gold

Hello from Birmingham, Alabama! The high today — on February 20 — is 77 degrees! Can you believe it? (Probably, if you know anything about Alabama weather.) I love the cold weather, so I'm a little put out about it. It's supposed to get into the low 80s later this week. Meteorologists are saying we're going to break record highs for this time of year. If you like warm weather, I'm happy for you! If you like cold weather, we can commiserate together.

But enough about my weather pattern opinions. Let's focus instead on that word "record" I mentioned above. We're in the midst of the final week of the 2018 Winter Olympics. While the focus is on winning that gold medal, we often hear about athletes breaking world records while they're competing. Talk about exciting! What if you could use that excitement with the kids in your missions group?

Healthy competition can be a useful tool to encourage kids' participation in missions projects and during your weekly meetings. Here are some ideas to help you take a cue from the Olympics and get your kids more involved than ever.

Get 'em Before They're Gone!

I guess I'm like most men. I really don't like shopping. Oh, I'll go to the hardware store. That's okay. Or, I'll go to the sporting goods store if I really need something. But, most of the time when I have to shop, I'd rather do it online in the comfort of my own home or office. And when I shop online, I love the fact that I don't have to wait in long lines to accomplish the task at hand — you know, "Need it, find it, buy it and wait for it to be delivered to me."

Once a year, national WMU offers an incredible clearance sale that even I like — great items, great variety and really great prices! All I have to remember for this particular sale is that when the stock has been depleted, it is sold out. There are no back orders.

Right now is the time for the annual clearance sale! There are some great items available — at great prices — for children's missions leaders like you! But if you don't want to miss out on these great deals, you'd better hurry. Once an item has sold out, it is gone for good.

The following items are included in this year's WMU Clearance Sale:

Spring Break Is Right Around the Corner!

It's winter now, but spring break is on its way! Got plans yet? I would think many of the families in your church already have plans for spring break and maybe even have trips planned. That makes this month the perfect time to go ahead and put missions projects into families' hands for them to do while on vacation.

Consider sharing these ideas with the families of your church. (Tip: You can post these individual suggestions in social media or share a link to this blog in your church or children's ministry newsletter.)

Ideas for family spring break missions:

Doing a Lot with a Little

I recently had the opportunity to re-read the story of Jesus feeding the 5,000.

To recap, over 5,000 people came to hear Jesus and even be healed by Him. Gathered out in the middle of nowhere, people started getting hungry as the day wore on. Jesus perceived the need at hand and asked His disciples where they could find food for the people there. His disciples were not very optimistic. Even if they could find something for everyone, it would cost as much money as a single man could earn after 200 days of work just to give 1 person a tiny piece of bread to eat. What they did find was a small boy who offered to share what he had: 5 loaves of bread and 2 fish.

Spoiler alert: with those 5 loaves of bread and 2 small fish, Jesus was able to abundantly meet the needs of the people. Not only was He able to meet their stomachs, but there were also 12 baskets of food left over! It was a miracle! Something only God could do.

Lead with Confidence

As a small child, I was afraid to go to the counter at a fast food restaurant to ask for a drink refill. I hated it so much. I couldn't tell you why—the people behind the counter didn't have a reason to refuse me a free refill. And I highly doubt the scenarios of humiliation I pictured in my head would have ever happened in real life. Nevertheless, I was too shy. My parents would usually make me go anyway; otherwise, I wouldn't get a refill. I’m thankful to them now for trying to get me to be less shy, although I'm certain I didn't appreciate it at the time!

When I was in school, I had so many opportunities to speak up and answer questions posed by my teachers. I probably only spoke up about 15 percent of the time. I felt a desire to raise my hand when I thought I knew the answer, but I didn't want to risk being incorrect and humiliating myself. As it happens, I usually had the correct answer and would be disappointed that I didn't speak up. But I couldn't risk it, right?

Beat the Wintertime Blues: Plan a Cool Missions Event

Here in the Deep South, we have been experiencing some unusually frigid days this past week. For this Goldilocks-type girl—you know, not too hot, not too cold—the sub-freezing temperatures make me want to stay indoors, all bundled up in my sweats and furry socks in front of a warm, crackling fire. It's even been too cold for my "It's-not-cold-I-wear-shorts-all-year-long" 12-year-old son. Needless to say, he has a bad case of cabin fever and can't wait to get outside to ride that new bike he got for Christmas.

More than Resolutions

I've never been very good at making—much less keeping—New Year's resolutions. Oh, I'll give it a passing thought as I hear others talk about their resolutions to lose weight, exercise more, spend more time with their kids, etc. However, I've learned over the years that many, if not most, of those people who made those resolutions never kept them for more than a few weeks. Don't believe me? Visit a local gym on January 2 and then again on February 16. See if you notice the difference!

What it comes down to for me is not so much about making yearly resolutions I won't keep as it is about digging in and doing the hard work to accomplish what needs to be accomplished—in other words, setting goals and accomplishing them.


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