National WMU

Cultivating a Missions Lifestyle

Someone once asked me, “How do you cultivate a missions lifestyle in young believers?” I answered the question with examples from my life. It started when I was in Acteens. The Girls in Action leader of my church asked if I wanted to help her with GAs. Then I was given opportunities for leadership through state missions camps and state Acteens Activators teams.

In college, the associational WMU council invited me to join its team. We traveled for hours together to state training events. I taught missions discipleship conferences in the association. I was awful. They loved and encouraged me anyway. When I felt God’s call on my life and made the decision to go to seminary, my associational WMU director used her own money to drive me to visit the campus two states away.

Do you get the picture? Missions leaders taught me. They loved me. They accepted me. They gave me responsibilities. They let me fail and learn. They poured their lives into mine. We have to love, nurture, bless, and turn our young people loose for God to do what He wants through their lives.

Share the Gospel by All Means

Skeeter was once a homeless man, beaten, thrown over a bridge, and left for dead, but God had another plan. He is now employed by the Nashville Rescue Mission, where he first learned of God’s grace. In his testimony, he said, “If a Christian had told me about God’s grace when I was a child, how different my life would have been.” His words are convicting. We must share Jesus with the people God puts in our path each day. There is no higher calling.

When we receive Jesus as our Lord and Savior, we immediately become responsible to share the gospel with other people. As powerful as the gospel is, it can’t share itself! While some of us are called to go to remote areas of the world as missionaries, most of us must focus on sharing the gospel right where we are with the people we know or those we come in contact with in our everyday lives. We must be intentional in trying to reach the missions field that’s all around us by all means.

Families on Mission

Sharing God's love together is sure to ignite a lifelong passion for missions in your family! Use these resources at home to reinforce what preschoolers are learning at church. Talking about and praying for missionaries will spark creative ideas for helping others in your own community.  

WMU has developed resources that can help your family reach out to others.


Play and Learn July 2017

Living in Niger

The Lane* family, George and Megan and their children, Samantha, Dakota, Hannah, and Nathan, live in Niger. They meet families who live in grass dome huts. Would you like to live in a home with a grass roof?

Print this page.  See sample below.

Play and Learn sampleUse a pencil to connect the dots.

Draw yourself in the hut door.

Color the hut.

Christmas in August

Christmas in August

Christmas in August is a way your small group can directly help a North American missionary with items needed for ministry and outreach. The North American Mission Board and national WMU partner in choosing the missionaries who then provide a list of items they wish to receive. Missions groups gather the requested items and send them to the missionaries. 

The missionaries expressed gratitude for your support when they sent their requests. They are excited about receiving these items!

 

How did it begin?
Started in 1927 by a group in Charlottesville, Virginia, Christmas in August has grown to be a national ministry each year. Read more of the history...

 

How can my group participate?
Pray, choose a missionary (or a few), gather your supplies, mail your packages, and pray for how your items will be used. 

Thank you for registering your group!

Thank you for registering!

Click on the link below to download your free registration certificate for your group. Fill in the blanks on the form to customize, print, and display in your meeting room. Links will open in a new browser window.

By All Means Resources 2016–2017

Priced Resources:

Associational Leader Tool 2016–2017

This CD contains an overview of the 2016–2017 year for all associational leaders, Project HELP: Post-traumatic Stress Disorder information, and planning suggestions for all age-level associational leaders. Promotional resources and graphics are also included in this vital resource for associational leaders.
W163105 • $14.99 Now $3.79

 

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Lottie Moon

 Lottie Moon by Louise Barbour

Lottie Moon was born in Virginia on December 12, 1840. She was named Charlotte Digges Moon, but everyone called her "Lottie." She grew to be a cultured and educated woman. In 1873, she obeyed God's call to go to China to share the gospel.

Lottie spent most of her years in Tengchow and P'ingtu, China. She wore Chinese clothes and lived like the Chinese people. The Chinese people respected Lottie. Her missions work won many Chinese to Christ.

Lottie loved the Chinese people. She often made personal sacrifices to help the Chinese. When there was not enough food for the people, Lottie gave away her food. She ate so little that she suffered from malnutrition. She was very sick. A missionary nurse was bringing her home to the US to see a doctor. But Lottie died on board a ship in the harbor at Kobe, Japan. She died on December 24, 1912. She was 72 years old.

Annie Armstrong

 Annie Armstrong by Louise Barbour

Annie Walker Armstrong was the first corresponding secretary (executive director) of Woman's Missionary Union. She was born on July 11, 1850, in Baltimore, Maryland. Her family was very active in Baptist life. Annie went with her mother to the missionary meetings of Woman's Mission to Woman. There she learned how important it is to give to and pray for missions. She developed a heart for missions. Annie worked with Indians, immigrants, Blacks, and children. In 1882, Annie helped organize the Woman's Baptist Home Mission Society of Maryland. She was the first president of the society.

Project HELP

Through an initiative called Project HELP, WMU identifies a social and moral issue and ties in national projects that help lead the church to address it.

Since the launch of Project HELP in 1994-1995, WMU has focused on a variety of universal problems over the years ranging from hunger and poverty to HIV/AIDS and racial injustice. With each issue, we seek to raise the level of awareness and provide practical approaches anyone can implement to open the door for meeting needs and sharing the gospel.


2014 - 2018
Project HELP: PTSD

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can affect anyone—veterans, first responders, victims of violence, natural disaster survivors, and others. 

One of the most healing resources for someone who suffers from PTSD is community, and being in community is one of the core functions of the body of Christ. Discover how you and your church can walk alongside them.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a diagnosable mental disorder as classified by the DSM-V.  Some key facts about PTSD include the following:

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