Missionary Stories

Missionary Spotlight Update: Hernando Cardenas

Church planter Hernando Cardenas might say while everything changes, in many ways, everything stays the same. Families come to Chandler, Arizona; some are brought into Cardenas’s church; but after a short time, several families leave the area. Although Cardenas is reluctant to see these families leave, he knows this is one way believers take the gospel to other areas. In the meantime, new families join the local Hispanic community and the challenge is renewed.

Cardenas continues his ministry of friendship by helping local Hispanics find jobs and housing. By offering them help with basic needs, he and others show the love of Jesus in the most practical ways.

“We are adjusting to these changes and changing our mentality to see that the church in Chandler is a missionary hub for the Hispanic world. As for me and my family and the leaders I am training, we live to spread the good news of salvation.”

Getting “Out of the Box” to Reach the Deaf

Deaf pastor and church planter John Wyble and his wife, Denise, serve the Deaf community through 2 Deaf congregations in Virginia. They use American Sign Language to communicate God’s message of redemption.

What are some of the challenges you face in reaching the Deaf and how do you deal with those?

John: We have to overcome the walls built up through worldly lifestyles. We have found through years of ministry that building relationships is crucial. By living a righteous and compassionate example, we are ready to share the gospel when the right time comes. One example is when deaf ladies at our church host a women’s retreat on the beach. They will pay the way for unsaved friends. They were thrilled when the unsaved woman Denise sponsored became a believer.

What are some of the ways your churches serve the community?

Meeting Challenges and Opportunities in Ukraine

Linda Gray faces daily challenges as she serves as a single missionary in Kharkov, Ukraine. Whether dealing with vehicle maintenance problems, overcoming preconceived notions about Baptists as a cult, or working with leadership in the churches, Gray knows where to seek help, where to give a strong witness, and where to cooperate for the proclaiming of the gospel message.

Almost 98% of Ukrainians would identify themselves as Christian because they were baptized into the Orthodox church as infants. But only a small percentage of Ukrainians are born-again followers of Jesus. Though Gray has been a missionary for 18 years, she has spent 13 years in Kharkov. In previous years, she worked with church women’s groups, small-group Bible studies, and English as a second language, but now much of her focus is helping to minister to more than 200,000 Ukrainians in her region who have been displaced by war.

Starting Over Again

For Loren and Karen Dickey, the beginning of 2017 brought many challenges as they moved from Veracruz, Mexico, on the Gulf Coast inland to the Bajío. This region is considered the “Heart of Darkness,” the least reached area in Mexico, where only about 2% are Christians. This was the Dickeys’ fourth move in 18 years as International Mission Board missionaries in the Americas (having served in Nicaragua, Chile, Peru, and Mexico), but they sensed that they were “starting over again.”

From the onset, the couple knew this move would be different. Even though they only moved to another state in Mexico, they are learning the culture of the Bajío. They are also “still getting a grasp on Mexican Spanish,” which is different from the Spanish they’ve used before.

Finding Waldo

When Peter Assad was scouring the pages of the Where’s Waldo? books as a child, he had no idea that a couple of decades later he and his wife, Grace, would be planting a church in Waldo.

So where’s Waldo? At one time a town on the southeast side of Kansas City, Missouri, Waldo is now a lively family neighborhood and business district in the heart of the city, with a population of about 13,000. Assad said Waldo is “a very diverse area, boasting a small-town feel while remaining very much urban—young, old, rich, poor, white, black, and everything in between.”

In January 2016, he and a team of committed leaders launched The Church in Waldo, which is presently sharing a building with Antioch Baptist Church. “We seek to reach the diversity of Waldo through a diversity of ministries all united around this single theme: to know Jesus and make Him known,” Assad said.

Missionary Spotlight Update: David and Regina White

Missionaries David and Regina White in Guatemala share that the believers in Nearar are making an effort to share the gospel in the Nenoja area, which is about an hour’s mountainous walk away. The Whites share that the citizens of the spiritually dark Nenoja area have been resistant to evangelical efforts thus far but believers from Nearar have been attempting to visit in the area every Saturday. Pray for the family in Christ of Nearar as it leads the effort to reach those in Nenoja and for the lost who need the hope of Christ. Additionally pray for the church in Nearar as it pursues building a facility in which to worship.

The Whites ask for continued prayers for their Sunday Bible studies in Nearar and Thursday gatherings in Muyurco. Additionally they will be participating in and encouraging Bible studies on Sunday evening in Chiquimula and Zacapa for which they covet your prayers. Lastly lift up the Whites as they continue work this spring while transitioning to depart for stateside assignment in July.

Breaking Down Walls and Building Relationships

A circle of friends surrounds Melissa* and lays hands on her shoulders as they pray for her healing from breast cancer. Deborah squeezes Melissa’s arm in encouragement and to remind Melissa that she’s not alone.

Melissa and her family attend Harvest Church at Anthem, which Deborah Bishop and her husband, Mike, planted in Florence, Arizona. She had not been attending the church for very long before she received the cancer diagnosis.

“Melissa has said more than once how thankful she and her family are that God brought them to our church because of the love and support they have received,” said Deborah, a North American Mission Board church planter. “They love hearing the Word of God preached each week and she says that it always speaks to her and her family.”

Recently Melissa’s cancer went into remission.

Missionary Spotlight Update: Garth and Patty Leno

On February 10, The Gathering Windsor helped some very special members of its community make lifetime memories when the church hosted Night to Shine, a prom night experience for people with special needs.

Sponsored by the Tim Tebow Foundation, Night to Shine is centered on God’s love, which made it an ideal outreach event for The Gathering, whose mission is to bring glory to God through lives changed by the gospel of Jesus Christ.

In a Facebook post, Pastor Garth Leno wrote that the church was “praying that God [would] empower our planning team to create an unforgettable event that will make every participant feel like a King or a Queen for the night.”

The event held special meaning for Leno and his wife, Patty, as their 30-year-old daughter, Jamie, attended Night to Shine—her first prom. The event was a significant opportunity for the church as well, Leno said.

Just Another Mom

Tomoko joined the small group meeting at Miriam Christy’s home mainly as a chance to meet other moms—particularly expatriates who were living in Peru. Tomoko and her husband had moved to Peru from Japan for his job.

Each week, a group of moms gathered at Miriam’s home to hear her teach chronological Bible storying. In the course of the studies, a mom at the local school died of cancer. Miriam decided for her next study she would discuss what the Bible says about suffering and sorrow.

Tomoko later told Miriam that she was raised in a nonreligious home and had had difficulty believing in a god because of suffering in the world.

“Of course there is no God, because how could there be a god if things like this happen,” she would think.

After Miriam’s Bible study, though, Tomoko’s perspective began to change. When Tomoko’s husband lost his job, she said her first thought was, “There is no God!”

“But then she remembered what I had taught her and she said, ‘God is good, so maybe God has a better plan and this is just a part of it,’” Miriam said.

God Never Fails

Bob and Pam Brownfield met at church when he drove down from Alaska to go to school at Auburn University in Alabama. Upon graduation, Bob worked as an engineer, while Pam was a clinical microbiologist. When God called them to be missionaries, no organization would appoint them because Pam has lupus. Finally the directors of African Bible Colleges urged them to obey their calling and trust God with Pam’s health.

In 1994, they arrived in Malawi, along with their 4 children. There were many adjustments to be made during their 2 years there. The biggest adjustment at first was all the family members being together most of the time, but they quickly learned to love that. The children missed their activities like ballet and gymnastics. Grocery shopping was a problem because the products available changed from day to day, causing Pam to have to improvise menus.          

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