WMU Blog

What Should I Do First?

“If I knew where to begin, I would have already started!”

Have you ever thought that before? Working on any children’s ministry project, activity, or event can seem overwhelming at times—especially if you don’t have a great place to begin. And it’s the same way when you are planning a recognition service for your Girls in Action, Royal Ambassadors, or Children in Action members as well. So, let’s start planning this year’s recognition service in the right place: prayer!

(You didn’t expect that, did you? You expected me to say that you needed to total the number of badges and patches kids had earned this year and place an order. Nope!)

Start with prayer, and thank God for the kids and families who are part of your children’s ministry and missions discipleship each week. Ask God to show you how to best share with your congregation and community the missions projects and activities your kids have completed this year.

Following Well: 3 Secrets Great Leaders Know

While leadership sounds appealing, many consider following to be subservient. “I’ll never be a follower” is a statement we often hear. In the course Follower Skills, Danette High states, “We will spend far more of our lives following than leading. Following is not a place to let your guard down, or to take a break from leadership.”

Great leaders understand the vital and dynamic relationship that must exist between leaders and followers. They also know when to lead and when to follow. These leaders remain excellent followers. Danette compares following and leading to a couple dancing. “Both have their own moves, but if the leader and follower truly partner, that’s where the beauty occurs.”

Since developing follower skills is practically non-existent in leadership training, many leaders have no idea how to do so. There are at least three secrets that great leaders know about following well.

Oh, Those Babies, Ones, and Twos! Part 3

Terrific Twos

I think they should be known as Terrific Twos! If you teach two-year-olds, you know how terrific they can be, as well as what a challenge they can be. During this year, twos really move out of the baby stage of life as they grow in so many ways. Twos begin to do many things for themselves, but may still be like a baby at times. The word mine can be heard over and over, which is the result of their growing independence. They begin to speak in sentences and ask questions. Twos gain in the use of the small muscles of their hands as they hold crayons or pound play dough. We can guide them to learn about missions as they use their new skills as two-year-olds.

  • Say the Bible thoughts often. Relate Bible thoughts to activities. As twos look at nature items in a box, tell them: The Bible tell us, Look at the wonderful things God made (see Job 37:14).

Get Plugged In

Arriving in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, NAMB church planter Jay Parks knew building relationships was vital to building New Life Church. When his son got involved in soccer, Jay attended practices and games, looking to “plug in where families already were,” he says. He soon began coaching, and after a year-and-a-half, he has met many families through it.

Jay and his wife April also committed to engage two families a week by inviting them to dinner, hosting over 100 families so far.

“This shifts a focus from just inviting them to church to simply trying to get to know them,” he affirms.

The soccer field and the Parks’ dinner table have brought many into the fledgling congregation. “Building relationships is so important when trying to reach people with the gospel,” Jay emphasizes.

(You can read more about the Parks’ story at www.newlifekona.com.)


By Ann Maniscalco

Make an Impact for the Kingdom

As a young professional, you’re probably working hard to make ends meet. (Maybe your ends meet just fine, but that hasn’t always been the case for me.) When you work hard to earn every penny, it probably means your two most valuable resources are time and money. You have to spend 40-ish hours a week at work, so the time you have left you want to spend relaxing, hanging out with friends and family, or participating in your favorite hobbies. These can all be good, God-glorifying things. Why the pressure to invest your precious moments in other people? Because people matter to God.

In Sorrow and in Joy

Easter offers open doors to share the message of hope found in Christ

The day before my daughter’s fourth birthday, we buried her two-year-old cousin. I watched my family try to cope at the funeral. When my brother carried the tiny casket from the church, I thought my heart would break in half. It is not right for parents and grandparents to bury children. From the words of the minister, I took comfort. He told us Oakley was in the presence of the Father. He reminded us of the pain Oakley endured every day of his life, and since his death, Oakley has been pain-free. I took strength from the words spoken by the minister at the funeral as he shared from the Bible. Those words of comfort sustained my family during a very difficult time.

Your CMD Stories (part 5)

Children's Ministry Day is a great way for children to show God's love to the world.

We’ve got more stories for you! Let’s hear what children from across the country did for this year’s Children’s Ministry Day to love their neighbors.

 

“Our kids baked, packaged, and delivered about 150 cookies to the residents at Harvest Manor nursing home in our home town. I was really proud to see that they took their time during the delivery—visiting with the residents and praying with them. More than once I peeked through a door to check on the kids and saw hands held and heads bowed.” (Take a look at the photo to the right to see the kids with their bags of cookies!)

—Brandy Tullos, for the children at Watson Baptist Church in Denham Springs, Louisiana

 

Four Ways Kids Can Make a Difference

Kids continually surprise us with their care and compassion for others. As their missions leader, how are you fostering that compassion during your time with them each week? Believe it or not, participating in a good old-fashioned fundraiser is a great way to begin! The Annie Armstrong Easter Offering collects funds for missions work right here in North America. You and your kids have a chance to directly impact the same ministries they read about each week. Not sure where to begin? Here are 4 ways your kids can make a difference:

Spring Is In The Air: In Like a Lion, Out Like a Lamb

Spring is often considered to be a time of renewal. The grass grows, trees begin to bloom, and pollen fills the air. (Aaaachoo!) The whole earth is waking up from a long winter’s nap.

We also enter into a period of change. We shake out the dust and stale air of winter from our homes in preparation for the activities of summer to begin. We break out our warm weather wear (including our ill-fitting swimsuits) and throw our heavy overcoats and decorative Christmas sweaters to the moths.

But if you live in the Southeast, odds are that Spring may not come as smoothly as you might expect. One day, the sun is shining and the birds are singing, but the next day the temperature drops 20 degrees and you’re breaking out the earmuffs!

Maybe that’s just how transitions go. Rarely in our own lives, do we ever experience a smooth transition. Renewal is full of fits and starts before finally settling in to something new. As Student leaders, have you seen this to be true?

Sowing the Seeds

Gina, Bob, and their children recently moved to a new city. To meet the neighbors and begin sowing seeds of kindness and the gospel message, they planned a “dessert on the driveway” event.

On eye-catching postcard-sized invitations, they introduced themselves and invited neighbors to drop by on a certain day and time to enjoy ice cream and cookies. Attaching a ribbon loop to each invitation, they dropped them off on the neighbors’ doorknobs early that week.

Setting up a few chairs and a table with refreshments, name tags, and balloons, Gina and Bob were delighted when a few neighbors stopped by. Children played together as the adults chatted. Soon a few more ventured over, and one neighbor volunteered to grill hot dogs the next weekend.

Friendships were formed. And doors were opened!


By Ann Maniscalco

 

 

 

 

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