Adults on Mission

Missionary Spotlight Update: David and Chris Cole

This summer was an exciting time at David and Chris Cole’s church, Oak Tree Church in Lee’s Summit, Missouri. The church hosted a youth camp, a holiday fireworks display, and a craft day for women. The craft day was the first one put on by the church and connected women for Christ over a special, one-sitting project.

As kids go back to school during the month of August, family schedules become busier. Pray for the Coles, their 5 sons, and their church, as they, too, must manage busier schedules and work to continually point people to Jesus. Of the more than 20,000 people within a 3-mile radius of the church, 91% does not attend church. Pray for Oak Tree to be able to reach many families for the Lord.

Art as Outreach

I am not an artist, but I recently discovered a way to explore painting and accomplish a project I am not afraid to display. The popularity of social painting is increasing as a way to get together with friends, have a good time, and come away with something uniquely yours.

Our church hosted several painting parties recently as missions offering fund-raisers and outreach events. Men and women, teenagers to senior citizens, novice to experienced artists gathered together to pray, paint, and fellowship. We invited unchurched friends, family, and co-workers to join the fun and demonstrated Christ to them.

Search your area for social painting venues that offer group classes or order kits online and plan your own party. Then grab a friend, some canvases, acrylic paint, and brushes and paint for the love of Christ together.

Lynn Durham is a Kentucky pastor’s wife with a heart for teaching women how to increase their faith.

WMU in the New Year

The summer season is quickly coming to a close. Before you know it, it will be time to start the new church year. What are you as a leader doing to prepare for the new year in WMU?

If you have not considered attending training in your state, then you should definitely look into it.

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Simple Hospitality

Bill and Betty were a sweet couple in our church. Several years ago, Betty and I were involved in a mentoring group where she was my mentor.

Our times together were encouraging. Yet they were nothing elaborate. Betty just simply invited me into her home for conversation each week. We shared coffee and some of Bill’s fabulous desserts. He was quite the cook!

Just a few years ago, they both went to be with the Lord just 1 day apart. When I heard of their deaths, I was sad; however, God reminded me of their gracious hospitality and encouragement when I needed it the most.

He also reminded me that I need to find someone to whom I can show hospitality. I have such a great example of what that looks like, so I have no excuse. Will you join me in showing hospitality to someone today?

Hospitality on Mission

“Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have shown hospitality to angels without knowing it” (Heb. 13:2).

Hospitality is often thought of as an event usually in someone’s home where people are entertained. However, hospitality goes so much deeper than that. Hospitality is an attitude of welcome. It does not matter what kind of home you own or how good a cook you are. It just means you welcome others with open arms.

How can you use hospitality in a missional way? It’s quite easy, actually. It’s as simple as inviting unsaved friends, family, or neighbors into your home. When people feel welcomed, they are more open to hearing about the gospel.

Provide them with a meal and conversation where you learn more about them and their needs. As you learn more about them, you can begin to share the gospel and relate it to their current situation in life.

Engaging New Members

Being the new person is not always easy, especially if you are prone to shyness. So it’s important that we as church members or members of a missions group be intentional in making new people feel welcome. How do you engage guests or new members in your church or missions group with hospitality?

Here are a few ways you can practice hospitality with them:

  • Smile—Greet guests and new members with a friendly smile. Let them know how glad you are to meet them.
  • Remember—Ask their name and find ways to remember it. When you see them again, you’ll be able to call them by name.
  • Connect—Find a point of connection. Maybe you both enjoy the same hobbies or share similar tastes in food.
  • Encourage—Offer a word of encouragement and let them know they are welcome in your church or group at any time.

Missionary Spotlight Update: George and Megan Lane*

“There are only a few believers in . . . 1 of the main villages we work in and the strongest believer is a 14-year-old kid named David*. He has only been saved a few years, but he is growing rapidly in his faith. He shares the gospel with some of his friends even though they don’t accept it and mock him some for it. He does not have electricity at his home, so when it gets dark there isn’t really anything he can do. But he has the New Testament on an audio device so he listens to that from nightfall until he goes to sleep. He knows the Bible very well! He can quote from memory many parts of the Bible. Since he doesn’t have the Old Testament on audio (and he can’t read very well yet), George has been teaching him the Book of Exodus. After teaching about Moses and the burning bush and how the voice from the bush said, ‘I AM,’ George flipped over to John 8, when Jesus says that He is the ‘I AM.’ As George was reading in [the Zarma language], David was pretty much quoting the whole chapter from memory!”

*Names changed.

Hospitality Brings Jesus’ Love to Neighbors

Each day, the population of Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona, increases significantly. Phoenix grows by about 300 daily, or about 100,000 annually.

With only 1 Southern Baptist church for every 18,500 people, it is an ever-present challenge to get the message of Jesus Christ’s love to newcomers and the 5.49 million people already living in the metro area, said Monty Patton, a Send City missionary and founder and co-pastor of Mountain Ridge Church in Glendale, located northwest of Phoenix.

Patton works with sending churches and their church planters to establish ministries in Phoenix and Tucson. He; his wife, Nancy; their 2 daughters; and their son-in-law are all devoted to area church-planting efforts.

They have found that building relationships is essential in proclaiming Jesus Christ to the burgeoning masses—1 person at a time.

Simple Gestures Open Doors to Gospel

Mandy Wells prepares “memelas” (small tortillas brushed with bacon grease) with some national friends in Oaxaca, Mexico.

Sharing a meal or inviting someone into your home for coffee or water shows hospitality in this city of about 300,000. Though simple gestures, they create opportunities to establish friendships with indigenous people and share about Jesus Christ.

Wells and husband Jim are missionaries in an area of Oaxaca (pronounced wah-hah-cah). The couple and their 2 young children have been there 16 months.

“One thing that we really try to do is build friendships,” Mandy Wells said. “Whether people come to Christ or not after having heard the gospel, we will still be their friends and continue investing in their lives. . . . Simply spending time really getting to know people opens the doors for us to share the gospel with those around us.”

Although the nationals often mix religions and practices (idol worship, animal sacrifice, etc.), the majority of them know about Jesus Christ. Yet “they have no understanding of the significance of Jesus’ death and resurrection,” Mandy Wells explained.

Neighborhood Barbecue: Open Doors to the Gospel

Community is not static. Busy lives, fences, and transient neighbors often hinder our ability to build close relationships with neighbors next door and down the street. Whether we live in an urban community or a rural setting, we can always benefit from learning about our neighbors. Growing neighbor relationships can aid in times of crisis, help celebrate successes, and encourage efforts to look out for each other’s homes and families. Good neighbor relationships can lead to close friendships as well as lives changed with the gospel.

In a day when a wave is the most contact we may have with neighbors, a neighborhood barbecue is one way to begin. Neighborhood get-togethers also provide opportunities to share the gospel and discover ministry needs.

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