Mission Projects

Respect and Pray for Those in Authority

Entering a room in the intensive care unit, I introduced myself as the hospital chaplain, and the very sick woman in the bed raised her hand as if to physically push me away and boldly proclaimed, “I don’t believe the Bible, and I don’t believe in God.”

Many of our elected officials may feel the same way. They may want to push us away. They may or may not welcome our prayers on their behalf, but it does not change our responsibility to pray for them.

Pause now to read Romans 13:1–8 and then consider these motivations to pray:

Link up with a Nearby CWJC/CMJC Site

Across the nation, more than 200 Christian Women’s Job Corps/Christian Men’s Job Corps sites are bringing God’s light to their cities, serving families who find themselves dealing with issues such as homelessness, drug or domestic abuse, imprisonment, or lack of adequate education. Adult missions groups looking for a ministry in which to invest their time, energies, and love will find a myriad of ways to do so by linking with a nearby CWJC/CMJC site.

Would your group commit to spending the next year reaching out to these women and men? What are some crucial needs your members could address? Take these steps to explore an exciting missions adventure:

Investigate

Learn about CWJC/CMJC by visiting wmu.com/jobcorps. Find contact info for a site near you. Invite the site coordinator or a volunteer to present a program for your group. Better yet, take some folks to visit the site during a session.

Minister to Local Officials: Let Your Light Shine in Local Government

In a city where city hall sat in the shadow of no less than 3 church steeples, I often found it odd that local congregations weren’t more involved with their local leaders. As an employee of local government, I would handle dozens of daily correspondence for local officials. Emails and letters from local organizations, schoolchildren, and concerned citizens were often present. Communications from local churches or believers offering encouragement or help—well, those were few and far between.

It would be difficult to pin down an exact explanation as to why more believers weren’t reaching out to their local officials. Perhaps they were too busy with the goings-on of their church’s event calendar or they simply didn’t want to be involved. Then there is the sneaking suspicion that many believed the lie that because of their religious convictions, they wouldn’t be heard. What a tragedy it would be if believers neglected to pray for and encourage local officials.

Prayerwalking: Uncover Clues to Needs in Your Church Neighborhood

Week after week, I wheel into our church parking lot, pull in my favorite space, and hustle inside through the usual entrance. Seldom do I notice the neighboring landscape in the shadow of our steeple, much less the latest changes to the half-mile block surrounding our campus.

Call it routine, but perhaps I’m not alone in my traditional way of “doing church.” Have I become too comfortable within the walls of our sacred abode? Suddenly that powerful mandate known as the Great Commission saturates my heart like an unexpected summer rain. Jesus is calling us to go, to take His case well beyond the walls of His church into a lost and dying world.

Prayerwalking is a key step in answering His call.

Neighborhood Barbecue: Open Doors to the Gospel

Community is not static. Busy lives, fences, and transient neighbors often hinder our ability to build close relationships with neighbors next door and down the street. Whether we live in an urban community or a rural setting, we can always benefit from learning about our neighbors. Growing neighbor relationships can aid in times of crisis, help celebrate successes, and encourage efforts to look out for each other’s homes and families. Good neighbor relationships can lead to close friendships as well as lives changed with the gospel.

In a day when a wave is the most contact we may have with neighbors, a neighborhood barbecue is one way to begin. Neighborhood get-togethers also provide opportunities to share the gospel and discover ministry needs.

Community Garden Ministry: Any Fruit in the Garden?

Do you have a green thumb? Not everyone does. I actually killed an aloe plant once. (Yes, really.) I placed it on a windowsill behind a set of blinds facing a dark garage. Then, I forgot it existed. It was beyond hope when I found it again. I realized then that avoiding maintenance for a month only to douse it superfluously in a day wasn’t going to resurrect anything.

Time Worth the Effort

The fact is growing a garden, a friendship, a prayer life, or even a Christlike mind-set takes daily tending. It is a purposeful activity to grow. When seeking to reach others for Christ, we need to make a few plans ahead of time. If we are willing to be creative for the sake of the gospel, God will supply the resources.

Green thumb or not, anyone can find ways to minister through community gardens. Do you have such places where you live? It’s easy to find out. A quick search on the Internet may surprise you. Often, you will find information about renting plots as well as whom to contact as the site coordinator. If there are waiting lists in your area to lease a plot, consider starting a community garden by yourself or with a group.

Storytime: Tell Your Story

Almost everyone loves to eavesdrop on the characters of Lady Mary in Downton Abbey and Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind. The drama, the characters, the intrigue, the costumes . . . the story! So what’s your story?

Everyone has one. You may think your story is boring or embarrassing but definitely not epic. However, your life’s journey may be the catalyst to encourage someone to find God’s purpose and plan for his or her life.

As a theatre major in college, I had to play many characters on stage. More than memorizing lines, I used a character analysis sheet with questions like the ones below to delve into the character to find out what made her who she was. Not every question could be answered, but with close study of the script, I could find many inferences and facts that would help me understand what made this character “tick.”

Be On Mission during Summer Vacation

Summer Missions

Summertime is often a time when things slow down. The kids are out of school, the days are longer, and there is often a feeling in the air of relaxation and rejuvenation.

Do you notice this in your church, as well? Attendance is usually lower during the summer months because families take vacations at various times. Church activities might be canceled in favor of other events. Organizations within your church might take the summer months off so nobody misses anything important. Or your church might adjust programming to a summer schedule.

No matter where your church falls in the variety of summer schedules, it makes sense to use this time to take a break, step back, and prepare for a fresh, clean slate in the fall. That might mean meeting in a different location or trying something different from time to time.

Regardless, we need to remember that we never really get to take a break from growing in our relationships with Christ. If you are a youth leader and want to help your students continue to grow in their faith, even during the summer, why not try a few of these ideas?

Law Enforcement Ministry: Offer “Peace”

Reading the headlines of the newspaper or a news website can fill your mind with fear instead of peace. Over the past week, I’ve seen articles about a mentally challenged man beaten and abused by teenagers, a shooting at an airport, and drug busts. Crimes are being committed every day. How does a society deal with those who go against the laws of the land? It begins with the men and women who take an oath to protect and serve the citizens of this country.

There is a huge need to minister to these dedicated individuals who are on call 24/7 and put their lives in harm’s way. Here are some ways you can show your support:

Pray specifically for law enforcement officers and their need to know Christ. Pray for opportunities to share the good news and build relationships. Obtain a roster and pray specifically for protection, health, officers’ families, wisdom, discernment, and the ability to make quick and rational decisions.

Habitat for Humanity: Every House Is Built by Someone

“This isn’t a story about doing good,” Joyce Daugherty said of volunteering, along with husband Bob, with Habitat for Humanity (HFH). “This is really an account of our willingness to be available. It is about living by faith.”

It all started while visiting their daughter at Baylor University in Texas, where they saw a house being built on a flatbed truck. Their daughter said the students were building it in their spare time for HFH.

HFH was founded by Millard and Linda Fuller after visiting Clarence Jordan at Koinonia Farm near Americus, Georgia. During their stay, the Fullers and Jordan developed the concept of “partnership housing,” where those needing housing would work alongside volunteers to build simple but decent housing, and in 1976, HFH was born. Since then, 6.8 million people have found stability with “safe, decent and affordable shelter.”

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