Nobody Tells Me Anything!

How did you learn to use makeup? Did you wake up one morning knowing how to make a quilt? What about playing a musical instrument? Did that come to you out of nowhere? Aside from the rigors of consistent practice, most of us learn new skills when someone shows us how to hold the guitar or violin, stitch fabric together, or apply eye shadow. In
other words, someone models the skill for us.

There are many components involved in becoming a leader who communicates well. Let’s consider 4 of them, but remember that communication can be verbal or written, making clear communication just that much more difficult!

Pay attention to your attitude. Your attitude, positive or negative, will show as you speak or write. Our influence as leaders is often more widespread than we realize. As you carry out your responsibilities, craft your verbal and written communications carefully, making certain you are encouraging and enthusiastic. Working with others can be very rewarding, and everyone will be more willing and generous with his or her time when the atmosphere is a positive one.

On Mission: Here and Now in North America

Each year, your gifts to the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering help support more than 5,000 missionaries and more than 3,800 chaplains throughout the United States and Canada who are sharing the gospel in some very tough places.

This year’s theme is On Mission: Here and Now. For North American missionaries, “here and now” is their missions field. For each of us, “here and now” is a challenge to live a missional life wherever God has planted us.

This year’s official date for the Week of Prayer and Mission Study for North American Missions is March 4–11. However, the prayer guide and other materials are not dated, so your church can choose any week during the Easter season to participate.

Promote the offering and the week of prayer this year by using the promotion ideas guide or one of these suggestions:

CMD 2018: Go Serve

Children's Missions Day (CMD) 2018 is coming soon! In fact, this annual February event will celebrate its 11th year this Saturday, February 17. It's not too late to join other children's missions groups nationwide in a great day of service to share God's love with people right in your own community. So, lace up your sneakers and get ready to hit the road and go serve!

Appropriately, the theme for this year's event is Go Serve. As you prepare your group for this special day, help children identify people in your area who are hurting — whether it's physically, spiritually or emotionally. Remember that a successful CMD project gives children the opportunity to tell someone what they know to be true about God while also meeting a physical need or offering words of encouragement. Ask children, What would you do for these people to share the love of Jesus with them?

Happy New Year Book!

It’s that time again—time to start planning for the new year. The new year in WMU, that is.

When you think about planning for WMU, the WMU Year Book most likely springs to mind. For years, it has been the annual planning resource for church WMU leaders. It outlines the WMU emphasis, provides monthly plans for each WMU age-level organization, and highlights ways to be involved in WMU ministries. Still, you may have found it, well, incomplete.

In order to do more detailed planning each quarter, you have needed a subscription to Missions Leader. The quarterly kit provides implementation ideas for the emphases on the Southern Baptist Convention’s calendar, along with leadership tools and color posters.

Complicated, isn’t it?

Not anymore. WMU has put everything you need to plan for a successful year of missions education and involvement in one resource. And all those other helpful things like posters? Throughout the year, supplemental materials will be posted as exclusive digital content on

Focus on WMU: It’s about Missions

Focus on WMU is not about WMU. It’s about missions. It’s about the work of God through the church by which the gospel of Jesus Christ is extended in word and deed to all the people in the world.

WMU is just a vehicle through which Christian believers can “understand and be radically involved” in the work of God. It encourages participation in the work of the church and denomination. It aids in developing spiritually toward a missions lifestyle, which includes learning about missions, praying for missions, giving to missions, serving in missions, and supporting missions.

Focus on WMU "by All Means"

I remember so vividly my years as a GA. I enjoyed learning about missions, praying for missions, giving to missions, and doing missions. It was in Girls in Action that I learned about the Cooperative Program and how the Annie Armstrong Easter Offering and the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering support missionaries. GA was my window to the world.

As an adult, I knew the impact WMU missions organizations had had on my life and I so desired that my daughters would also have that biblical worldview. I became a GA leader before my daughters were in the first through sixth grade. It was such a joy seeing the gospel come to life for them as we learned about missions in GA.

Throughout GA and all the other WMU missions organizations, you will find the following 6 objectives in the curriculum and other resources:

Develop: Changing the Way WMU Leaders Are Trained

As technology has changed, it has changed the way educational classes can be delivered. While many still enjoy the traditional classroom setting with a teacher and the camaraderie of other students, some need options that allow them to learn on their own schedule. I am one of those learners.

I have taken courses through Develop, WMU’s online and on-demand leadership training. While leadership conferences are still offered by national WMU, state WMUs, and associations, Develop’s courses extend the availability for leadership training to anyone with a computer at any time of the day or night. I have worked on courses at all hours, both on my computer and on my smartphone.

I appreciate that all Develop courses are reasonably priced and provide opportunity for interactive learning. Courses are self-paced and designed to be completed in about 4 hours. Each Develop course is a stand-alone module with a month to complete the work. The deadline provided me with motivation to get finished in a reasonable amount of time yet without too much time pressure.

Consider All Options

We recently purchased a new car, and I was amazed at all the options we were offered. What color? What seat package? We had choices about the radio, tires, warranty, paint finish, floor mats, and a GPS system. The options were seemingly endless. Oh, and yes, there were about 15 ways to finance our purchase!

We live in a time when options are available in almost every area. Even hamburgers can be custom-made! With all the options people are offered in their lives, we often make a fatal mistake when we approach leadership responsibilities: we do not offer options. We plan our meetings with no choices. We insist that activities must be conducted the way they have been in the past. After all, they were good enough for us in 1970, so why not now?

The people you and I know are so accustomed to making choices that they are not terribly open to joining a group or participating in a project where their input isn’t asked for—or wanted. Their opinions matter, and they want to be part of the decision-making process. A preordained format or action planned by 1 or 2 leaders isn’t terribly attractive to them.


Do Whatever It Takes

Leaders, regardless of their positions, need to carefully consider the promises they make. The key question is “Can I keep that promise?” Many factors impact whether leaders can make changes, and it’s not uncommon for those influences to be completely out of their control.

Leading successfully is a challenge not unlike climbing a snowcapped mountain. The higher you go, the thinner the air! Leaders make sincere promises but cannot keep them and feel as if they are climbing higher and higher without a support system. What, then, can leaders do to ensure the success of their work?

Here are several suggestions that can help you as you try to fulfill the promises you’ve made:



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