Project Idea: Kid's Water Day

Kids playing with water

American children can turn on any faucet in their home and enjoy clean water to drink. However, so many are unaware that children around the world do not have this same privilege. By hosting a game day with fun water activities, children can have a lot of fun playing in water but at the end, learn about how water is a scarce commodity in most other countries. The purpose of this project is to teach children about the need for clean water, inspire a passion in them, and encourage them to make a difference through PWPL.

Here’s what your church can do:

Prepare for the water day.

  • Make sure you have a big grassy area. Tell children to wear water shoes so that they will not slip and fall. Also tell them to wear dark shorts and shirts.
  • Supplies needed include the following:
    • Big buckets for water—tubs and garbage cans work well (1 per group)
    • Hard plastic cups (1 per group)
    • Large sponges (3 per group)
    • Plastic pails (2 per group)
    • XXL T-shirt (1 per group)
    • 2-liter bottle (1 per group)
    • “Big Chill”—put plastic spoons in a plastic foam cup of water then freeze it (3 per group)

Host the water day games.

  • First, divide groups into 10–15 people. Mix the ages and have the oldest be the leaders. Have a big bucket of water for each group. Line the groups up behind the buckets of water.
  • Typhoon—The first person in each group runs down, gets a cup of water, runs back and yells “Typhoon!” and throws the water into the face of the next person. The next person goes and does the same.
  • Armpit/knee relay—Give each group three big sponges. Each person runs to the big bucket and dips the three sponges into the water. Then that person runs (or waddles) back to the line with one sponge between their knees and the other two under their armpits. They hand off the sponges to the next person in line.
  • “Hole-y” pail—Drill holes into plastic pails. Have each group sit in front of the big bucket of water. Place a pail with no holes behind the last person in line. The first person in line dips the “hole-y” pail into the water, and each person passes it down the line over his or her head to the back. If there is any water left, the last person in line puts it in the bucket. The team to fill up their bucket first wins.
  • T-shirt pass—Each person runs down to the water bucket, dips the shirt in the water, and puts it on. They then run back to their group and take it off. Make sure someone is holding down the person’s other shirt.
  • Multi-sponge relay—Have each group sit in front of the big bucket of water. The first person dips a big sponge into the bucket of water, and each person passes it down the line over his or her head to the back. If there is any water left, the last person in line puts it in the bucket. The team to fill up their bucket first wins.
  • Bottle fill relay—One person lays down and puts a 2-liter bottle on their forehead. The others in the group run down with a cup to get water, run back, and try to pour the water into the bottle. The team to fill their bottle first wins.
  • Sponge toss—One person stands at the big bucket of water. The other teammates will line up about six feet away. The person at the bucket dips a big sponge into the water and tosses the big sponge to the first person in line. That person squeezes the sponge into a bucket and then goes to the back of the line. The first team to fill up their bucket wins.
  • The big chill—Each group gets three frozen cups and tries to get the spoon out of the ice. They take turned using their body and clothes to melt the ice. They may not use their teeth, another object, or the ground. The spoon may not be broken. The first team to get all three spoons wins.
     

Teach them about PWPL

  • Use the water facts sheet (found here) to explain that many children around the world do not have clean water. In fact, many children must drink water that looks a lot like the water in these large buckets. Can you image drinking the water we just used to play games?
  • Explain to them that there is something that they can do to help. Tell them about how PWPL provides filters and wells to missionaries and their villages around the world.
  • Have children decorate water jugs and bottles to place around the church and have them share in service how the church can provide other people with clean water.

Inspiration: Chuck Webb, Wilsonville Baptist Church, Wilsonville, Alabama

Involvement: 
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